Jaguar Land Rover: Set to Slash 2,000 Jobs Around the World

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According to reports, Tata Motors’ owned, Jaguar Land Rover is looking at trimming down the non-manufacturing operations.

Soon after Jaguar Land Rover’s announcement of its plan to go all-electric by year 2025, now says it will trim down 2,000 jobs worldwide. In particular, this is to take place in the next financial year. Also, the company did inform that they are reviewing the Jaguar Land Rover organisation, now.

In fact, the company did announce the same in a recent statement. The statement said that the company does anticipate a net reduction of around 2,000 employees. Mostly, from the company’s global salaried workforce in the next financial year.

Notably, the company employs around 40,000 people all around the world. Though, the expected cuts are to take place in Jaguar Land Rover’s non-factory operations.

Jaguar Land Rover Plans to go All-Electric by 2025

Earlier this week, the automobile giant did announce an ambitious plan. Mainly, driving in six fully-electric Land Rover variants. Interestingly, in the next five years. Also, the plans to electrify all the models by 2025.

Importantly, the company is looking at trimming down its non-operating jobs at a crucial time. Especially, when tougher emission norms in many markets did pose a challenge. Precisely, for its diesel variants.

Moreover, the Jaguar Land Rover is mostly known for the high-performance E-Type model. In particular, from the 1960s and 1970s. Now, Jaguar is facing the same challenges like other carmakers. Mainly, because transitions to electric vehicles while attempting to keep the feeling and power of a luxury combustion engine model.

Last month, Tata Motors also said the semiconductor shortages and Brexit-linked supply disruptions did concern them. Though the company’s luxury car sales recover, the automaker did add that they are yet to hit production.

Further, Tata Motors did post three straight quarters of losses. Notably, the COVID-19 crisis did dent the sales. Also, did exacerbate uncertainties over Britain’s exit from the European Union. And the weak demand and rising costs did add to the further slipping sales. But, it did bounce back to clock a profit. Only in its third-quarter by the end of December.

 

 

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